About AWF


    

The AWF Mission Statement

AWF is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, inspiring, and assisting individuals and organizations to value, conserve, enhance, manage, and protect wildlife and wildlife habitat.

For a copy of the AWF Year Strategic Plan, click here: AWF Strategic Plan

How the AWF Got Started

The Arizona Wildlife Federation, a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation was founded in 1923 to take politics out of fish and game management and to promote the management of Arizona's natural resources on a scientific basis. The AWF got its start as the Arizona Game Protection Association and celebrated 80 years of conservation activity in 2003.

For a short history of AWF written by Steve Gallizioli, click here: AWF History . For a historical sketch of the AWF written by Max Layton, click here: Historical Sketch by Max Layton
 

Objectives of the AWF

From the outset the AWF's primary goal has been the establishment and maintenance of a Commission/Department form of wildlife administration, free of political influence. This was accomplished in its first year of existence. The current Commission/Department of Game and Fish is essentially unchanged from what was initially created.

Continuing objectives include:

  • Promoting legislation dealing with conservation of our natural resources, the protection of the rights of Arizona outdoorsmen, and the improvement of outdoor recreation.
  • Vigorous and impartial support of enforcement of all state and federal conservation, game and and fish laws.
  • Encouraging conservation education in our schools.
  • Promoting maximum outdoor recreation, including hunting and fishing, through scientific principles and the practice of multiple use of the public lands of Arizona

The People of the AWF

The AWF is run by a volunteer Board of Directors and several paid staff members.  Click here for the directory.

AWF President, Tom Mackin, Receives Field & Stream Monthly Hero Award

Tom Mackin, Flagstaff, Ariz.

Mackin has spent 28 years volunteering between 900 and 1,500 
hours annually with 10 different sportsmen’s groups and agencies to benefit Arizona wildlife and fish. In that time, he has helped maintain more than 100 wildlife watering tanks, raise more than $500,000 in funding, and educate almost 2,000 new hunters. “Young people don’t have time for a monthlong hunter-ed class anymore, so I helped the Arizona Game and Fish Department develop a weekend campout to accomplish the same thing in three days,” he says. Mackin secures grant money to underwrite the cost of the program and meals for the students. The class fills up almost as soon as it’s announced.

Last Updated (2010-03-11 08:45:05)